7 Major Acupressure Points For Toothache Relief: What To Know?

It is rare to associate acupressure with toothaches. Still, it is an incredible remedy to alleviate oral pain and invigorate blood circulation. However, remember that the quick relief this treatment may provide must never be a substitute for professional dental treatment. You can visit A2Z Dental’s clinic located in Rockhampton if you have sharp tooth pain, throbbing pain, or toothache. Keep reading to learn about acupressure points for toothache relief, including common causes of toothaches and signs when to call a doctor.

The woman suffers from tooth pain.

It is rare to associate acupressure with toothaches. Still, it is an incredible remedy to alleviate oral pain and invigorate blood circulation. However, remember that the quick relief this treatment may provide must never be a substitute for professional dental treatment. You can visit A2Z Dental’s clinic located in Rockhampton if you have sharp tooth pain, throbbing pain, or toothache. Keep reading to learn about acupressure points for toothache relief, including common causes of toothaches and signs when to call a doctor.

 

Understanding Acupressure

Acupressure is an old and natural approach to relieve pain. By applying pressure points in the body, you can lessen the tension in your muscles and get pain relief in most cases. Even though acupressure points for toothacheacupressure is usually used for other body parts, many studies stated that this technique can treat mild to moderate toothaches. However, it is best to immediately schedule an appointment with your dentist once you have an ongoing toothache and the pain worsens with acupressure.

 

Cause of Toothaches

Tooth decay and poor oral hygiene are some of the most common causes of toothaches. Other reasons are teeth grinding, infected gums, or other health issues that affect your mouth, such as TMJ.

Even though pain medications and antibiotics help relieve pain, it is ideal to try natural remedies that do not threaten your health.

 

Toothache Symptoms

Some of the most common complaints are jaw pain and toothache. There might be severe discomfort to pressure, or to hot or cold stimuli. Usually, the pain continues for more than 15 seconds after removing the stimulus. As the inflammation increases in the area, the pain becomes more intense. It might transmit to the ear, cheek, or jaw. Other signs and symptoms of toothache include:

  • Headaches
  • Bad breath
  • Pain with biting in your teeth or jaw
  • Teeth sensitivity
  • Bad taste in your mouth
  • Discharge or bleeding from around a tooth or gums
  • Trauma or injury to the affected part
  • Jaw swelling or swelling around a tooth
  • Swollen glands
  • Fever

If you have some of these manifestations, click on this link to book your dental appointment. These symptoms may sometimes be linked to tooth fracture, dental decay, or gum disease.

 

How To Use Acupressure For Toothaches?

Fortunately, you can perform acupressure for toothache relief by yourself and in the comfort of your own home. Suppose you prefer another person to do it for you. In that case, a friend or a family member can easily do acupressure on you. Before you start, look for a quiet, relaxing place in your home away from any distractions.

Through each activity, make sure to breathe deeply and relax your muscles as possible as you can. Use profound, firm pressure to every point for at least one moment before continuing on to the following point. You can do these activities on numerous occasions a day or until the pain has died down.

 

The Major Pressure Points For Toothaches

 

Cheek Bone Hole (SI18)

The SI18 point is usually positioned on the lower edge of your cheekbone. You can find it by locating the piece of your face straight down from the external corner of your eye and opposite the lower edge of your nose. In any case, applying firm pressure on this area can relieve tooth pain, swollen gums, jaw swelling, facial paralysis, Bell’s palsy, and TMJ issues.

 

Jaw Chariot (ST6)

The ST6 point is in between your upper and lower jaw. It is the muscle before your earlobe. To locate this, feel the space where the two pieces of your jaw connect. This point centers around TMJ issues, lockjaw, jaw pain, sore throat, and toothaches.

 

Union Valley (LI4)

The Union Valley pressure point is in the fleshy section between your index finger and thumb. Massaging this area can ease headaches, TMJ, rhinitis, skin diseases, toothaches, and eye problems.The woman uses acupressure while waiting for her dental appointment. In addition, LI4 is also popular in treating various types of chronic and inflammatory pain.

 

Inner Court (ST44)

The ST44 point is on the top of your foot in the middle of your second and third toe. This pressure point can reduce facial pain, sore throat, Bell’s palsy, epistaxis, and toothache pain in the upper jaw. Additionally, it also cures gastric pain and digestive-related issues.

 

Great Ravine (KD3)

This pressure point is in the hollow area of your ankle outside of your circular or bone. To locate the KD3 point, squeeze around the inner piece of your ankle until you do not feel your bone. This area is for eye issues, dizziness, headaches, insomnia, irregular menstruation, asthma, lumbar pain, and toothache.

 

Gall Bladder (GB21)

The GB21 pressure point is at the highest point of your shoulder. You can find it between the end of your shoulder and the side of your neck. In fact, Gall Bladder 21 can help treat toothaches, headaches, neck pain, and facial pain.

 

Stomach (ST36)

The ST36 point is in the lower area of your knee. Typically, it is where your pinky is resting when you put your hand on your kneecap. In addition, the Stomach 36 pressure point is usually for pain, stress, tiredness, and nausea.

 

When to Call a Doctor

Remember that acupressure should not replace a visit to your dentist or doctor. Nevertheless, you can use acupressure for temporary pain relief while waiting for your dental or medical appointment.

Furthermore, you should seek immediate medical attention if you experience at least one of the following:

  • Fever
  • Severe pain
  • Bleeding from the mouth
  • Swelling in your mouth, face, or neck
  • Trouble swallowing or breathing

Doing acupressure using one or all of the suggested pressure points may temporarily relieve tooth, gum, or mouth pain. However, acupressure should not be applied in place of a medical or dental appointment. In addition, stop practicing acupressure if you are encountering extreme pain while doing it.

 

References:

Oral Health Conditions.

https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/conditions/index.html

Jaw, Gum, or Tooth Pain.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/decision_guide/jaw-gum-or-tooth-pain

The Benefits and Uses of Acupressure.

https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-benefits-of-acupressure-88702